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List of Scheduled Holes

Shared Duck Leases Season Program Properties


Last updated : 06/06/2016

Bayou Basin Holes



  1. Baker Creek Bend – deep water canal feeding into greater Lake Henry. Food source: aquatic life, aquatic vegetation and hardwood nuts.
  2. Baker Creek Big Cypress – upper Lake Henry. Food source: aquatic life, aquatic vegetation and hardwood nuts.
  3. Horseshoe – deep water hole on upper Lake Henry. Food source: aquatic life, aquatic vegetation and hardwood nuts.
  4. Delta Slough – flooded buck brush slough. Food source: aquatic life, aquatic vegetation. Duck harvest: high of 24 ducks with gadwall, teal, mallards, northern shovelers, scaup, and wood ducks in the bag. General layout and management of waterfowl habitat: applying general moist-soil management principles.
  5. Aust Farm # 1– agricultural field. Food source: harvested waste grain and planted millet. General layout and management of waterfowl habitat: an agricultural field that lay fallow last summer as dirt moving processes were completed. This is the site of a former aquaculture impoundment but has been fully converted to a traditional grain field.
  6. Aust Farm # 2 – agricultural field. Food source: harvested waste grain and planted millet. General layout and management of waterfowl habitat: an agricultural field that lay fallow last summer as dirt moving processes were completed. This is the site of a former aquaculture impoundment but has been fully converted to a traditional grain field.
  7. Highway 8 Hole – flooded harvested grain field. Food source: harvested waste grain.
  8. Rattlesnake Pit – flooded harvested grain field. Food source: harvested waste grain.



Google Map of the Bayou Basin Holes

(1)The footnotes to the general layout and management of waterfowl habitat are taken from a report provided to MS Delta Ducks by Houston Havens, Waterfowl Program Biologist, Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks following the 2012 – 2013 duck season. The report began: “The properties are located in a great area for attracting wintering waterfowl. The recommendations found here will address the general layout and management of waterfowl habitat on the properties.” Houston met with us again in March of this year, and we continue to rely on his plan and advice.
(2)Japanese millet prefers wetter sites and can tolerate reflooding to 1/3 the height of the plant once it reaches 6-8 inches tall. Browntop millet prefers drier sites. In a wet summer, the Japanese millet should do well, and in a drier summer, the browntop millet should do well. In an average summer, they should both do well. By adding wild game sorghum to the mix, it extends the food availability to ducks through the different maturities of the blend. (3)Mowing in the fall will produce habitat that is attractive to ducks early in the season. The natural vegetation may be manipulated by mowing it after the seed heads mature. Mowing or disking some areas of vegetation will allow ducks to start using a wetland sooner. Most grasses will lie down after a frost, but some robust plants will remain standing throughout the winter. Opening up the wetlands to a maximum 50% open water is a good rule of thumb.




Turkey Bayou Complex Holes



  1. Shines Triangle – 7 acre triangular shaped field nestled along the edge of a hardwood timber tract. Food source: broadcast millet and wild game sorghum. General layout and management of waterfowl habitat: mixture of Japanese and browntop millet and wild game sorghum at 35 lbs./acre, after disking the area for a seedbed. (4)
  2. Shines Farm Habitat Complex # 1 – active deep water aquaculture impoundment in a habitat complex area. Food source: aquatic life.
  3. Shines Farm Habitat Complex # 2: The Tower – retired agricultural fish pond populated with natural grasses and sedges. Nesting area for local dabbling ducks. Food source: broadcast millet and wild game sorghum. Duck harvest: high of 24 ducks with gadwall, teal, mallards, northern shovelers, pintail, redheads, scaup, specks, and wood ducks in the bag. General layout and management of waterfowl habitat: a mixture of Japanese and browntop millet and wild game sorghum at 35 lbs./acre, after disking the area for a seedbed. (5)
  4. Shines Farm Habitat Complex # 3 – active deep water aquaculture impoundment in a habitat complex area. Food source: aquatic life. Duck harvest: high of 24 ducks with gadwall, teal, mallards, northern shovelers, redheads, scaup, and specks in the bag.
  5. Shines Farm Habitat Complex # 4 – retired aquaculture impoundment in a habitat complex area planted in row crop. Food source: harvested waste grain. Duck harvest: high of 32 ducks with gadwall and northern shovelers in the bag.
  6. Shines Farm Habitat Complex # 5 – retired aquaculture impoundment in a habitat complex area planted in row crop. Food source: harvested waste grain. Duck harvest: high of 3 ducks with teal and northern shovelers in the bag.
  7. Simmons Farm Habitat Complex # 1 – aquaculture impoundment planted in row crop in a habitat complex area. Food source: harvested waste grain. Duck harvest: high of 37 ducks with gadwall, mallards, northern shovelers, teal, scaup and specks in the bag.
  8. Simmons Farm Habitat Complex # 2 – idle aquaculture impoundment in a habitat complex area. Food source: natural vegetation. Duck harvest: high of 31 ducks with teal, mallards, northern shovelers, and scaup in the bag. General layout and management of waterfowl habitat: utilizing the natural grasses and sedges growing in this moist-soil area.
  9. Simmons Farm Habitat Complex # 3 – active deep water aquaculture impoundment in a habitat complex area. Food source: aquatic life.
  10. Simmons Farm Habitat Complex # 4 – aquaculture impoundment planted in row crop in a habitat complex area. Food source: harvested waste grain. Duck harvest: high of 30 ducks with teal, mallards, northern shovelers, redheads, scaup, and specks in the bag.
  11. Simmons Farm Habitat Complex # 5 – idle aquaculture impoundment in a habitat complex area. Food source: broadcast millet and wild game sorghum. Duck harvest: high of 21 ducks with gadwall, mallards, northern shovlers, scaup, teal, wigeon and wood ducks in the bag. General layout and management of waterfowl habitat: plant a mixture of Japanese and browntop millet and wild game sorghum at 35 lbs./acre after disking the area to prepare a seedbed. (6)
  12. Simmons Farm Habitat Complex # 6 – idle aquaculture impoundment planted in millet along with natural vegetation in a habitat complex area. Food source: natural vegetation and millet. Duck harvest: high of 13 ducks with teal, gadwall, and northern shovelers in the bag. General layout and management of waterfowl habitat: utilizing the natural grasses and sedges overseeded with millet growing in this moist-soil area.
  13. Simmons Farm Habitat Complex # 7 – impoundment in a habitat complex area. Food source: natural vegetation. Duck harvest: high of 30 ducks with teal, gadwall, mallards, northern shovelers, scaup, redheads, and specks in the bag. General layout and management of waterfowl habitat: utilizing the natural grasses and sedges growing in this moist-soil area.
  14. Simmons Farm Habitat Complex # 8 – idle aquaculture impoundment planted in millet along with natural vegetation in a habitat complex area. Food source: natural vegetation and millet. Duck harvest: high of 25 ducks with teal, gadwall, mallards, and northern shovelers in the bag. General layout and management of waterfowl habitat: utilizing the natural grasses and sedges overseeded with millet growing in this moist-soil area.
  15. McKinzey Farm Habitat Complex # 1 – idle aquaculture impoundment planted in millet in a habitat complex area. Food source: Japanese and browntop millet and wild grain sorghum. Duck harvest: high of 18 ducks with gadwall, mallards, northern shovelers, pintail, redheads, scaup, and teal in the bag. General layout and management of waterfowl habitat: plant a mixture of Japanese and browntop millet and wild game sorghum at 35 lbs./acre, disking the area to prepare a seedbed.
  16. McKinzey Farm Habitat Complex # 2 – aquaculture impoundment planted in row crop in a habitat complex area. Food source: harvested waste grain. Duck harvest: High of 14 ducks with gadwall, northern shovelers, and teal in the bag.
  17. McKinzey Farm Habitat Complex # 3 – idle aquaculture impoundment in a habitat complex area. Food source: Japanese and browntop millet and wild grain sorghum. Duck harvest: high of 24 ducks with mallards, northern shovelers, scaup, teal, and wood ducks in the bag. General layout and management of waterfowl habitat: a mixture of Japanese and browntop millet and wild game sorghum at 35 lbs./acre after disking the area to prepare a seedbed.
  18. McKinzey Farm Habitat Complex # 4 – aquaculture impoundment planted in row crop in a habitat complex area. Food source: harvested waste grain. General layout and management of waterfowl habitat: overseeding the grain crop in the low with Japanese millet.
  19. McKinzey Farm Habitat Complex # 5 – active aquaculture impoundment in a habitat complex area. Food source: aquatic life.
  20. McKinzey Farm Habitat Complex # 6 – active aquaculture impoundment in a habitat complex area. Food source: aquatic life.
  21. Country Club Hole – harvested grain field with flooded low surrounded by mature timber makes this a secluded venue. Food source: harvested waste grain.



Google Map of the Turkey Bayou Complex Holes

(4)Japanese millet prefers wetter sites and can tolerate reflooding to 1/3 the height of the plant once it reaches 6-8 inches tall. Browntop millet prefers drier sites. In a wet summer, the Japanese millet should do well, and in a drier summer, the browntop millet should do well. In an average summer, they should both do well. By adding wild game sorghum to the mix, it extends the food availability to ducks through the different maturities of the blend.
(5)Mowing in the fall will produce habitat that is attractive to ducks early in the season. The natural vegetation may be manipulated by mowing it after the seed heads mature. Mowing or disking some areas of vegetation will allow ducks to start using a wetland sooner. Most grasses will lie down after a frost, but some robust plants will remain standing throughout the winter. Opening up the wetlands to a maximum 50% open water is a good rule of thumb.
(6)The planted millet/wild game sorghum blend cannot be legally manipulated for waterfowl hunting.




Bear Creek Bottom Holes



  1. Six Mile Grain Field – idle aquaculture impoundment in a habitat complex area. Food source: harvested waste corn.
  2. King Rd. Ditch – idle aquaculture impoundment in a habitat complex area. Food source: Harvested waste grain.
  3. 3 Mile RD. Grain – idle aquaculture impoundment in a habitat complex area. Food source: Planted Rice
  4. 3 Mile RD. East – idle aquaculture impoundment in a habitat complex area. Food source: Planted Rice
  5. Bear Creek Timbers Edge – idle aquaculture impoundment in a habitat complex area. Food source: Planted Rice.
  6. Six Mile North – idle aquaculture impoundment in a habitat complex area. Food source: Planted Rice.
  7. 3 Mile East Ditch Bank – idle aquaculture impoundment in a habitat complex area. Food source: Harvested waste grain.



Google Map of the Bear Creek Bottom Holes

(7)When the bean leaves are beginning to turn brown and die back in late July or early August, over-seed the beans with a hand seeder. The leaves will fall off the beans, providing somewhat of a covering and moisture cap, and the millet/sorghum blend should start to germinate. After the beans are harvested, the millet/sorghum should take advantage of sunlight and proceed to produce. With timely rains, this can be an effective way to plant some small food-rich patches in otherwise low food areas.
(8)Ducks need foods high in carbohydrates when it gets cold and after arrival (after migrating long distances), nutrients to sustain proper body conditions, sites for pairs to isolate to solidify bonds in late winter, and high-protein foods while hens are molting. Historically, acorns provided ducks with a high-quality source of energy-rich carbohydrates. However, changes in landscape level hydrology and deforestation have made acorns less available to ducks today, and agricultural crops have helped fill the niche of a high-quality source of carbohydrates in many altered landscapes. Moist-soil habitats provide a variety of nutrients to waterfowl and excellent habitat for aquatic invertebrate production, which provide a source of high protein for molting hens. Scattered woody vegetation and forested wetlands provide the best habitat for pair formation and also provide good sites to forage for invertebrates.




Sunflower River Basin Holes



  1. Fish Belt – flooded harvested impoundment lying along a wooded canal. Food source: natural vegetation. Duck harvest: high of 13 ducks with gadwall, mallards, and northern shovelers in the bag. General layout and management of waterfowl habitat: an abundance of natural seed grasses and wild millet grow in this hole. The area will be disked to maximize growth of favorable grasses for the fall.
  2. Lake Dawson Complex #1 – active deep water aquaculture impoundment in a habitat complex area. Food source: aquatic life.
  3. Lake Dawson Complex #2 – active deep water aquaculture impoundment in a habitat complex area. Food source: aquatic life.
  4. Lake Dawson Complex #3 – active deep water aquaculture impoundment in a habitat complex area. Food source: aquatic life.
  5. Round Away Complex #1 – active deep water aquaculture impoundment in a habitat complex area. Food source: aquatic life.
  6. Round Away Complex #2 – active deep water aquaculture impoundment in a habitat complex area. Food source: aquatic life.
  7. Round Away Bayou Green Tree Corner Pocket – grassy edge of flooded hardwood impoundment. Food source: natural seed grasses and a mixture of milo and millet broadcast throughout the opening.
  8. Round Away Bayou Green Tree Donut Hole – flooded bottomland hardwoods. Food source: aquatic life, aquatic vegetation and hardwood nuts with a mixture of milo and millet broadcast in open areas with enough sunlight to sustain growth.
  9. Round Away Bayou Green Tree Tall Oaks Hole – flooded bottomland hardwoods. Food source: aquatic life, aquatic vegetation and hardwood nuts with milo and millet broadcast in open areas with enough sunlight to sustain growth.
  10. Quon Triangle – flooded harvested grain field. Food source: harvested waste grain.
  11. Porter Bayou #1 – flooded harvested grain field. Food source: harvested waste grain.
  12. Porter Bayou #2 – flooded harvested grain field. Food source: harvested waste grain.
  13. Porter Bayou #3 – flooded harvested grain field. Food source: harvested waste grain.



Google Map of the Sunflower River Basin Holes





Yalabusha River Basin Holes



  1. The Runway – flooded tupelo gum and cypress brake. Food source: nuts and aquatic life.
  2. Donut Hole – flooded tupelo gum and cypress brake. Food source: nuts and aquatic life.
  3. 2 AC Hole – flooded tupelo gum and cypress brake. Food source: nuts and aquatic life.
  4. Pepper Deadening - a wilderness - quality wetland area sandwiched between agricultural fields. Landscape features and conditions are ideal to sustain wintering waterfowl. Food source: natural vegetation and aquatic life.
  5. Pepper Deadening - a wilderness - quality wetland area sandwiched between agricultural fields. Landscape features and conditions are ideal to sustain wintering waterfowl. Food source: natural vegetation and aquatic life.
  6. Pontoon Blind – flooded tupelo gum and cypress brake. Food source: nuts and aquatic life.
  7. Pot Creek Hole – flooded tupelo gum and cypress brake. Food source: nuts and aquatic life.
  8. DU Hole – flooded harvested grain field. Food source: harvested waste grain.
  9. Hog Waller – flooded harvested grain field. Food source: harvested waste grain.
  10. McIntyre Scatters Grain – flooded harvested grain field. Food source: harvested waste grain.



Google Map of the Yalabusha River Basin Holes